Iron Miners
It is currently Sun Nov 19, 2017 10:13 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Trial Level Workings (UK) - Discussion
PostPosted: Thu Dec 25, 2008 2:44 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2005 11:33 pm
Posts: 3088
Location: Above the Sterling Hill Mine
This is the discussion for the Trial Level Workings photos from UK posted by Myles Standish.

To view photos click here:

http://www.ironminers.com/mineforum/vie ... hp?t=19977


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 25, 2008 2:50 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2005 11:33 pm
Posts: 3088
Location: Above the Sterling Hill Mine
Thanks for posting the photos up. They look very interesting. The mine looks very moist inside and corroded, kind of interesting seeing the timber sets still standing. Unless those were built recently.

We usually don't transverse water in coal mines due the the build up of AMD mud.. Many times it is almost like walking through quick sand. How old are these mines approximately?

Miner Greg


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2008 11:16 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:54 pm
Posts: 25
Location: England (UK)
Hi Greg,

The trial workings date back to the mid 1800's. The support in the picture is actually made of concrete, thats probably why it is still in good condition.

Stew


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2008 4:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2005 12:41 pm
Posts: 2927
Location: Hard coal region, PA
thats another one like Racketbrook where they worked the vein on the bottom.... instead of firing out bottom rock and working the vein from the top....which is easier.. Your mines look like snow whites seven dwarves made them! :lol: way cool though

_________________
This ain't longwall... this is long hole!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2008 6:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:54 pm
Posts: 25
Location: England (UK)
Don't forget, these places were in operation when Abraham Lincoln was not even a glint in his mothers eye ;)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2008 6:24 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2005 12:41 pm
Posts: 2927
Location: Hard coal region, PA
This is true! these are like the rock mines the ironminers team documents...in terms of age

_________________
This ain't longwall... this is long hole!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 3:49 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2005 11:33 pm
Posts: 3088
Location: Above the Sterling Hill Mine
Interesting to find such old Coal Mines in remarkable shape. Many of the Bituminous mines in Pennsylvania are long collapsed or caved when only being 20 years old. There probably is a big difference in the rock strata in your area verse the rock strata in the bituminous mines here in the US. How are the conditions of other coal mines in your area?

Miner Greg


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 6:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:54 pm
Posts: 25
Location: England (UK)
Miner Greg wrote:
Interesting to find such old Coal Mines in remarkable shape. Many of the Bituminous mines in Pennsylvania are long collapsed or caved when only being 20 years old. There probably is a big difference in the rock strata in your area verse the rock strata in the bituminous mines here in the US. How are the conditions of other coal mines in your area?

Miner Greg


Hi Greg,

The newer more modern the workings post 1950's, the more difficult it is to find access into them and when you do, water is never to far away!
The older workings we have access to (pre 1950's drifts) are all pillar and stall workings with props used as a last resort. The older workings in the UK certainly offer more potential for the coalmine explorer.
Looking at the wealth of drift portals that you have in the States makes us in the UK extremely jealous!!!

What is the average lifespan of a drift mine in the States, looking at the date stones a lot of them are dated from the 30's to the 50's? How come the government don't seal the entrances? Over here as soon as they close all traces of mining are erased!!

My Flickr site.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/b3tarev3/s ... 037747999/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 07, 2009 10:57 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2005 12:41 pm
Posts: 2927
Location: Hard coal region, PA
our government it lazy... they get to it when they get to it. Its the state government's responsibility. They actually require the mine operator to close the mine if its not going to be active for a certain amount of time....which a lot of times there's thoughts of selling the place, or re-opening it in the future, so they just don't get closed. The state eventually gets to the though..it just takes a while. Pre-1970something??maybe?? the mines weren't really required to do much with the opening except maybe push a pile of dirt in front of the opening. most of the piles are eroded way down now.

_________________
This ain't longwall... this is long hole!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2009 5:44 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2005 11:33 pm
Posts: 3088
Location: Above the Sterling Hill Mine
Myles,

From looking at least many of the hard rock mines in the UK, I get the impression that the mines are left open for people to explore. Is this not the case? I was getting jealous of your mines as it seems there are a lot of groups out there which look to be preserving the mines. It almost looks like abandoned mines are acceptable over there..

You older coal mines look to be in pretty good shape over all. I can understand newer mines not lasting as long due to the more "efficient" mining methods..

Miner Greg


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 5:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2008 1:54 pm
Posts: 25
Location: England (UK)
Miner Greg wrote:
Myles,

From looking at least many of the hard rock mines in the UK, I get the impression that the mines are left open for people to explore. Is this not the case? I was getting jealous of your mines as it seems there are a lot of groups out there which look to be preserving the mines. It almost looks like abandoned mines are acceptable over there..

You older coal mines look to be in pretty good shape over all. I can understand newer mines not lasting as long due to the more "efficient" mining methods..

Miner Greg


Hi Greg,

The hard rock mines are in the main looked after by caving clubs throughout the uk. Access to these is strictly through the caving clubs who have gone to great lengths to preserve these mines. Having said that there is a myriad of adits for hard rock workings if you know where to look.

The coal mines are a totally different story due to the increased risks that come from coal mining. We as a group are mainly interested in old coal mines and seek these out where ever we can. The latest abondonment that we gained access to was from the 1960's, unfortunately water was waiting to meet us a couple of hundred yards in.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group