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 Post subject: The name behind the mine- The Taylor
PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 6:48 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2005 8:32 pm
Posts: 788
Taylor breaker:
Tonnage:675,000 tons per year.
Located off North main Avenue in the borough of Taylor. Most traces of this site were recently reclaimed through growing greener money. The original breaker stood adjacent to the new breaker and was constructed in 1868. When it was built great care was taken with the grounds. Green lawns and even flower gardens were planted next to the breaker. This original breaker stood till 1916 when the new breaker was built. The Taylor coal breaker was the first all reinforced-concrete breaker constructed in the anthracite fields.It will be noted that the architect has furnished windows for daylight; also each post is supplied with tubes for wiring for electric lights, thus making this breaker an exceptional one for light and comfort of the employees. Under favorable conditions, the average wooden anthracite breaker has a life of about 20 yr., but mostly conditions are unfavorable to such longevity, and this, coupled with the rapidly advancing price of timber suitable for such structures, has caused engineers to consider the more durable iron and reinforced concrete as building materials. Wherever anthracite is prepared wet, the decay of the timbers is hastened. Also at this time the DL&W was in the midst of a concrete building spree. Most notable being the Tunkhannock viadust on that railroads main line. The breaker passed from DL&W into Moffatt coal companies hands in 1955. Processing anthracite from many of ints mines in the Lackawanna valley. 190 slope of the Lackawanna coal mine, the Storrs colliery, and also the mines in the area of the Sloan colliery ( 133 slope, 155 slope, etc) The breaker closed in 1974. It sat idle till a local construction company attempted to demolish it by pulling it over!!!! Needless to say it didn’t topple as they expected. And for most of the 80’s stood slumping over. It was taken down piece meal during the 1980’s and 1990’s. Finally all remains were demolished in 2009.
Moses Taylor (January 11, 1806 - May 23, 1882)
One of the richest men in america during his life. His fortune was estimated at the time of his death at $50,000,000.(1882 dollars)He was early connected with the efforts to develop the great coal-bearing region of northern Pennsylvania, being interested in the Lackawanna Iron and Coal Companies, and somewhat later bought largely of the depressed stock of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. After the monetary panic, in 1857, this stock fell to $5 per share; Mr. Taylor had faith in the future of the road, and bought this stock, and it rose to $240 in five years!!. In 1858 he became a Director of the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Company; and when Mr. Joseph H. Scranton died (in 1872), Mr. Taylor was elected president . The sum which Mr. Taylor bequeathed for a hospital, to be built at Scranton, was $250,000 in first mortgage bonds of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad; the real value is about $270,000. The trustees of this fund are President Edwin F. Hatfield, of the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Company, and President Sloan, of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. It will be known as the " Moses Taylor Hospital." The need of a hospital was particularly felt at Scranton on account of the numerous accidents to the men and boys employed in the mines, and the laborers on the railroad. This hospital still stands and is in use today. It might be interesting to know that the men of the companies that used the hospital never paid more than 10 percent of there bill for a stay!!! The remaining 90 percent paid by the company from which they were injured. This policy stood in effect till the late 1800’s.














Taylor breaker:
Tonnage:675,000 tons per year.
Located off North main Avenue in the borough of Taylor. Most traces of this site were recently reclaimed through growing greener money. The original breaker stood adjacent to the new breaker and was constructed in 1868. When it was built great care was taken with the grounds. Green lawns and even flower gardens were planted next to the breaker. This original breaker stood till 1916 when the new breaker was built. The Taylor coal breaker was the first all reinforced-concrete breaker constructed in the anthracite fields.It will be noted that the architect has furnished windows for daylight; also each post is supplied with tubes for wiring for electric lights, thus making this breaker an exceptional one for light and comfort of the employees. Under favorable conditions, the average wooden anthracite breaker has a life of about 20 yr., but mostly conditions are unfavorable to such longevity, and this, coupled with the rapidly advancing price of timber suitable for such structures, has caused engineers to consider the more durable iron and reinforced concrete as building materials. Wherever anthracite is prepared wet, the decay of the timbers is hastened. Also at this time the DL&W was in the midst of a concrete building spree. Most notable being the Tunkhannock viadust on that railroads main line. The breaker passed from DL&W into Moffatt coal companies hands in 1955. Processing anthracite from many of ints mines in the Lackawanna valley. 190 slope of the Lackawanna coal mine, the Storrs colliery, and also the mines in the area of the Sloan colliery ( 133 slope, 155 slope, etc) The breaker closed in 1974. It sat idle till a local construction company attempted to demolish it by pulling it over!!!! Needless to say it didn’t topple as they expected. And for most of the 80’s stood slumping over. It was taken down piece meal during the 1980’s and 1990’s. Finally all remains were demolished in 2009.
Moses Taylor (January 11, 1806 - May 23, 1882)
One of the richest men in america during his life. His fortune was estimated at the time of his death at $50,000,000.(1882 dollars)He was early connected with the efforts to develop the great coal-bearing region of northern Pennsylvania, being interested in the Lackawanna Iron and Coal Companies, and somewhat later bought largely of the depressed stock of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. After the monetary panic, in 1857, this stock fell to $5 per share; Mr. Taylor had faith in the future of the road, and bought this stock, and it rose to $240 in five years!!. In 1858 he became a Director of the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Company; and when Mr. Joseph H. Scranton died (in 1872), Mr. Taylor was elected president . The sum which Mr. Taylor bequeathed for a hospital, to be built at Scranton, was $250,000 in first mortgage bonds of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad; the real value is about $270,000. The trustees of this fund are President Edwin F. Hatfield, of the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Company, and President Sloan, of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. It will be known as the " Moses Taylor Hospital." The need of a hospital was particularly felt at Scranton on account of the numerous accidents to the men and boys employed in the mines, and the laborers on the railroad. This hospital still stands and is in use today. It might be interesting to know that the men of the companies that used the hospital never paid more than 10 percent of there bill for a stay!!! The remaining 90 percent paid by the company from which they were injured. This policy stood in effect till the late 1800’s.











Taylor breaker:
Tonnage:675,000 tons per year.
Located off North main Avenue in the borough of Taylor. Most traces of this site were recently reclaimed through growing greener money. The original breaker stood adjacent to the new breaker and was constructed in 1868. When it was built great care was taken with the grounds. Green lawns and even flower gardens were planted next to the breaker. This original breaker stood till 1916 when the new breaker was built. The Taylor coal breaker was the first all reinforced-concrete breaker constructed in the anthracite fields.It will be noted that the architect has furnished windows for daylight; also each post is supplied with tubes for wiring for electric lights, thus making this breaker an exceptional one for light and comfort of the employees. Under favorable conditions, the average wooden anthracite breaker has a life of about 20 yr., but mostly conditions are unfavorable to such longevity, and this, coupled with the rapidly advancing price of timber suitable for such structures, has caused engineers to consider the more durable iron and reinforced concrete as building materials. Wherever anthracite is prepared wet, the decay of the timbers is hastened. Also at this time the DL&W was in the midst of a concrete building spree. Most notable being the Tunkhannock viadust on that railroads main line. The breaker passed from DL&W into Moffatt coal companies hands in 1955. Processing anthracite from many of ints mines in the Lackawanna valley. 190 slope of the Lackawanna coal mine, the Storrs colliery, and also the mines in the area of the Sloan colliery ( 133 slope, 155 slope, etc) The breaker closed in 1974. It sat idle till a local construction company attempted to demolish it by pulling it over!!!! Needless to say it didn’t topple as they expected. And for most of the 80’s stood slumping over. It was taken down piece meal during the 1980’s and 1990’s. Finally all remains were demolished in 2009.
Moses Taylor (January 11, 1806 - May 23, 1882)
One of the richest men in america during his life. His fortune was estimated at the time of his death at $50,000,000.(1882 dollars)He was early connected with the efforts to develop the great coal-bearing region of northern Pennsylvania, being interested in the Lackawanna Iron and Coal Companies, and somewhat later bought largely of the depressed stock of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. After the monetary panic, in 1857, this stock fell to $5 per share; Mr. Taylor had faith in the future of the road, and bought this stock, and it rose to $240 in five years!!. In 1858 he became a Director of the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Company; and when Mr. Joseph H. Scranton died (in 1872), Mr. Taylor was elected president . The sum which Mr. Taylor bequeathed for a hospital, to be built at Scranton, was $250,000 in first mortgage bonds of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad; the real value is about $270,000. The trustees of this fund are President Edwin F. Hatfield, of the Lackawanna Iron & Coal Company, and President Sloan, of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. It will be known as the " Moses Taylor Hospital." The need of a hospital was particularly felt at Scranton on account of the numerous accidents to the men and boys employed in the mines, and the laborers on the railroad. This hospital still stands and is in use today. It might be interesting to know that the men of the companies that used the hospital never paid more than 10 percent of there bill for a stay!!! The remaining 90 percent paid by the percent paid by the company from which they were injured. This policy stood in effect till the late 1800’s.


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