Iron Miners
It is currently Tue Nov 21, 2017 7:20 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1 post ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: The name behind the mine- The Loree
PostPosted: Sun Mar 21, 2010 8:43 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2005 8:32 pm
Posts: 788
The Loree Larksville Pa., Hudson coal company
Leonor F. Loree (April 23 1858 – September 6 1940)

Was a captain of industry, being president, member of board of managers, and chairman of executive committee of the Delaware & Hudson R. R. Co.; director, Air Reduction Co.; director, Albany & Susquehanna Railroad Co.; president, chairman of executive committee and director, Albany Coal Co.; trustee, American Surety Co., of New York; director, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director. Bluff Point Land Improvement Co.; director, Boston, Cape Cod & New York Canal Co.; president, chairmai of executive committee, and director, Capitol Railway Co.; director, Champlain Transportation Co.; director, vice-president, etc., Chateaugay & Lake Placid Railway Co.; director, Chicago Junction Railways & Union Stock Yards Co.; director, Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railway Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director, Cohoes Railway Co.; director, Cooperstown & Charlotte Valley Railroad Co.; president and director, Cooperstown & Susquehanna Valley Railroad Co.; director, Electric Express Co.; director, Erie Railroad Co.; president and director. Fort William Henry Hotel Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director, Great Western Turnpike Road; chairman of executive committee and director, Greenwich & Johnsonville Railway Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director, Hudson Valley Railway Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director, Hudson Coal Co.; president, chairman of board of directors, and chairman of executive committee, Kansas City Southern Railway Co.; president and director, Kingston Realty Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director. Lake George Steamboat Co.; director. Mechanics & Metals National Bank of the City of New York; president ani director, MechanicsviUe & Fort Edward Railroad Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director, Napier ville Junction Railway Co.; director. National Employment Exchange; director, National Railways of Mexico, director, New York, Ontario & Western Railway Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director. Northern Coal and Iron Co ; president, chairman of executive committee, and director, North River Railway Co.; president and director. Northern New York Development Co.; director, Ontario, Carbondale & Scranton Railway Co.; director, Pere Marquette Railway Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director, Plattsburg Traction Co.; director, Port Jervis, Monticello & Summitville Railroad Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director, Quebec, Montreal & Southern Railway Co.; director. Rensselaer & Saratoga Railroad Co.; president and director, Rutland & Whitehall Railroad Co.; director, Schenectady Railway Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director, Schuylkill Coal & Iron Co.; director, Seaboard Air Line Railway Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director, Shanferoke Coal Co.; director, Sheafer's Creek Water Co.; director, Silverton Coal Co.; director, Southern Pacific Co.; president and director, Troy & New England Railway Co.; director, Troy Union Railroad Co.; president, chairman of executive committee, and director. United Traction Co.; director, Warren County Electric Light, Heat & Power Co.; director, Waterford & Cohoes Railroad Co.; director, Wells, Fargo & Co.; director, Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway Co.; director, Wilkes-Barre Connecting Railroad Co.
Graduated from Rutgers University in 1877.AMONG railroad men the country over Leonor F. Loree is universally known as "the man who made good at Johnstown." His rapid rise to the presidency of several great railroad systems and to a secure place among the captains of industry has failed to overshadow that daring engineering feat. The first news of the Johnstown flood was nowhere received with more consternation than in the railroad offices. Tracks, roadbeds, bridges had been swept away and it was to the railroads that thousands looked for immediate relief. An unknown division engineer, L. F. Loree, who chanced to be the most available man, was placed in command.
The young engineer's marvelous powers of endurance served him well. Throughout every hour of daylight he worked among his men on the tracks. When daylight failed him he turned to his correspondence till the light returned, while Sundays were spent in cleaning up his work. After that job Mr. Loree was jumped overnight from his position as division engineer to that of General Manager, an advance unparalleled in railroading.
Mr. Loree was born in Fulton City, Illinois, and after passing through the public schools entered Rutgers College. He entered the railroad service in 1877 as assistant on the
of America's foremost railways engineer corps of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Between 1879 and 1881 he worked as transit man on the Engineer Corps of the United States Army. The following year was spent in surveying the route for the Mexican National Railway. His astonishing capacity for work in the field procured rapid advancement and in the following year he became an engineer in the Chicago Division of the Pennsylvania system, from which he rose to be engineer of maintenance of way, later Superintendent of the Pittsburg division and General Manager of the division. He became a railroad president in 1901 and has been one ever since, first at the head of the Baltimore and Ohio, then of the Rock Island, and since Delaware and Hudson system. Loree also was president of the B&O and D&H at the same time. Being placed to the B&O when the Pennsylvania ( which he was vice president at the time) bought massive blocks of B&O stock. He resigned the B&O presidency in 1904
He became D&H president in 1907.
As president of the D&H he pioneered many innovative ideas, such as the “Loree: steam locomotive.The D&H claimed that the Loree was "the first four outside cylinder, triple expansion, non-articulated locomotive." Both the front and rear cylinders connected to the main pair of driving wheels. The rear cylinders, however, were not paired but cross-compounded. As the railroad stated in a leaflet from my father's collection, "Steam is expanded in three stages, being used first in a high pressure cylinder under right side of cab [20x32], then in an intermediate cylinder under left side of cab [27½x32] and finally in two low pressure cylinders at front of locomotive [33x32], from which it exhausts through the stack." To produce the steam necessary for this triple expansion, the Loree maintained a 500-pound pressure in a combination water-tube and fire-tube boiler. Delaware & Hudson's No. 1403, named the L. F. Loree. This experimental locomotive, built in the railroad's Colonie Shops, had been placed in service in April, 1933. No. 1403 was the fourth and last in a series of high-pressure locomotives that were the brainchild of the railroad's president, Leonor F. Loree, whose name the locomotive bore. While the earlier engines were 2-8-0s, the Loree was of the rare 4-8-0 configuration found only on a few railroads such as the Norfolk & Western. (It was known as the "Twelve-Wheeler" type.)Delaware & Hudson's No. 1403, named the L. F. Loree. This experimental locomotive, built in the railroad's Colonie Shops, had been placed in service in April, 1933. No. 1403 was the fourth and last in a series of high-pressure locomotives that were the brainchild of the railroad's president, Leonor F. Loree, whose name the locomotive bore. While the earlier engines were 2-8-0s, the Loree was of the rare 4-8-0 configuration found only on a few railroads such as the Norfolk & Western. (It was known as the "Twelve-Wheeler" type.)

Another of his innovations was the all welded boiler.
Not to be satisfied, he also believed the D&H to be the northeasts premiere railway. Being so he felt it should have an office building to show it. So in 1914-1915 a new building was constructed in Albany NY. Upon its completion it was already to small to house the D&H employees, so an addition to the new building was added.And completed in 1918.For the record it has to be stated Mr Loree was one of the most, if not the most anti union managers of all time. Loree remained president of the D&H till 1938, and died in 1940. The reason for his resignation was that the D&H was becoming a dinosaur. It was transforming from an anthracite carrier to a bridge line. And speed was necessary.

The Hudson coal company:
The whole purpose of this article is to concentrate on the coal industry. With the earlier, just background to give you an idea of the type of man Loree was. Under Lorree the Hudson coal company went through a period of modernization. Consolidation was the word of the day. Under his watch the Hudson built the Loree & Marvine breakers. All steel construction. The Loree breaker was built in a record 131 days. The purpose of the new Loree was to replace the previous one that had burned on the same site. In 1921 it broke the worlds record for daily production. A more complete history can be found on Loree page, which was written by John Pagoda. A dear friend of ours.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 1 post ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group